Entertainment

The case of Richard Jewell, Penguin Bloom, The Dig … movies online to see, or not, this week


During this health crisis and the closing of cinemas, the editorial staff Figaro offers you every Wednesday a selection of new products available on streaming platforms or VOD.

Le Figaro offers you its selection of films released this week online, on VOD or on streaming platforms.

A must see

The Richard Jewell case , the case is not in the bag

He does not have the physique of the job. The heroes are not the obese bad at themselves. Yet despite his overweight, Richard Jewell was one for three days. Afterwards, things turned sour. In 1996, this security agent, curled up in his clothes, thwarted an attack during the Olympic Games in Atlanta. It was he who found an abandoned backpack containing a bomb. The lives he saved number in the tens. Glory to him. He is entitled to the headlines. The televisions invite him. A publisher offers him a contract (naturally, a negro will be needed). Oh, easy. Funny feeling. It no longer touches the ground. His modesty suffers. Be reassured, the crowds loving nothing so much as to burn what they adored, he is soon suspected of having organized everything to advertise himself. The national idol turns into a monster. The fall is cruel. It portrays the customs of this time well. The subject was waiting for someone like Eastwood. In his films, he has always stood up for individuals. Institutions are not his cup of tea. It is not the first time that he is inspired by a news item. This allows him to paint the portrait of an innocent, clumsy. Jewell has nothing for him. He lives with his mother in an ordinary apartment, swears by law and order, has a knack for creating enemies. It’s not for lack of wanting to help. His zeal plays tricks on him.

Available on MyCanal

To have

The Dig , war and shovel

Carey Mulligan and Ralph Fiennes join forces to trace the discovery of Britain’s most fantastic 20th century treasure, that of Sutton Hoo. On the eve of World War II, the distinguished owner Edith Pretty hired an amateur archaeologist Basil Brown to excavate her land. Against all odds, the duo exhumed a funeral boat dating back to the Saxons. The enthusiasm of this discovery was tempered by a summer of 1939 when the clouds gathered. The war, which will stop the site, is approaching. Like disease. Under its very classic airs, this film by Simon Stone is of a tender and bittersweet melancholy on the passage of time, the mark we leave on the following generations, the inevitability of our death. Tried by life, Edith, serene and already elsewhere, and the pragmatic Basil communicate in silence and push a young generation, camped by Johnny Flynn and Lily James, to no longer hide behind the conveniences of a world on the verge of wavering .

Available on Netflix from January 29.

Penguin bloom , the healing bird

Taken from a true story, this Australian family film on disability is of rare tenderness and frankness without pathos or simplistic happy ending. Following a fall on vacation, Sam (Naomi Watts), a nurse and mother passionate about surfing, loses the use of her legs. The return to the house perched on a hill in Sidney which dominates these beaches that Sam can no longer walk is all the more cruel. To this tattered life is added a suffering and rebellious body. Despite the support of her husband (Andrew Lincoln, The Walking Dead) and their three boys, Sam sinks into depression until one day a baby magpie fallen from the nest is taken in by one of her children. Between the bird in distress and the tried mother of a family, a complicity is established.

Available on Netflix.

You can see

The farewell , a well-kept secret by Lulu Wang

Nai Nai (grandmother in Mandarin) jokes and has fun in all innocence. Carried by her natural joy and her many culinary and sporting activities, she wonders why her son and her beloved granddaughter do not eat her good meals and look gloomy. Yet there is not a shadow of a cloud in his apartment: the family gathers to celebrate first his birthday, then the wedding of his grandson, and therefore should rejoice. Nai Nai is suffering from an incurable disease and her relatives who have made the trip especially to see her have decided not to tell her anything. Nai Nai ignores that the union of the young couple is a pretext for the tribe to reunite. Billi, his Chinese-born granddaughter who was raised and raised in the United States, doesn’t hear it that way. Spontaneous, rebellious, the young woman is eager to confess the truth to her grandmother. Noticed at Sundance Film Festival 2019, Lulu Wang’s second feature film, The farewell (The Farrewel) was born out of a true lie. From an astonishing game of truth experienced by the 36-year-old Chinese director, (Touch and Posthumous). That she knew how to stage with a knowledgeable hand. Carried by the love of its protagonists.

Available until midnight Thursday on MyCanal.

Charlie, the newspaper that didn’t want to diefree drawing

Signed Hugues Nancy, who has made many historical documentaries, Charlie, the newspaper that didn’t want to die , is in the same vein as the excellent Simone Veil, family albums (2018) and François Mitterrand, family albums (2016). The journalist focuses on three dates: 1992, the (re) birth of Charlie Hebdo; 2015, the attack, and 2020, the trial of the alleged accomplices of the Kouachi brothers. The latter brings an energy to the documentary. Just like the testimonies of Riss, Coco, Simon Fieschi, Philippe Val or those of the cartoonists Alice and Juin, who joined the editorial staff. All demonstrate that Charlie hebdo is more alive than ever.

Available in replay on France 5.

The life of Brian Jones , the other Stone

“Without Brian, there would have been no Rolling Stones”, states Bill Wyman, who held the bass in the English band for nearly three decades. We could not say better, but it feels good to hear. Before the pair of “Glimmer TwinsMade up of Jagger and Richards take full light (and all copyright), the blond was the star of this white blues orchestra from the suburbs of London. Rebel, cultivated, seductive, this gifted multi-instrumentalist – he was the first to play slide guitar in England – had it all, except the talent for writing songs. He had the intuition that the blues was going to prevail, with great shots of his heroes, Elmore James in mind. Little prince of Swinging London, he burned himself in the fire of a glory he had wanted more than anything.

Available on Arte.tv and Youtube

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